Hanging Over My Head

You’ve never seen someone this excited to not have walls, and it’s only because I’ve got ceilings!

In the bedrooms…
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The bathrooms…
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In the kitchen…
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In fact the great room is the only room without ceilings for the moment. And let’s just say this was a lot smoother than the last time I tried to put drywall on the ceiling.

And let me tell you, something… I lied a little about not having any walls.

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I’ve got one.

But don’t even get me started on what’s going on with the doors.

10 Responses

  1. Looks great! What type of recessed lighting are you using? We’re getting some for our living room and I’ve been tasked with finding the “right light”. And, Neil didn’t like my idea of “something that isn’t ugly and works”. So, recommendations?

    1. I picked up a couple of contractors packs of 6″ recessed cans at Lowes! I think my one rule was that the trim had to be all white, not the white with black interior.

      For the vaulted ceiling we had to buy angle cans and I wanted a bronze trim so it wouldn’t stand out on the wood ceiling, but those four were twice as expensive as the other twelve we used. The best deal I found online was here: http://www.affordablequalitylighting.com

  2. I would seriously think of what kind of drywall you use in the bathroom and laundry room, and im my honest opition….the kitchen two around the dishwasher and sink zones….. Make sure you use moisture resistant drywall or a “dense Armour board” with mesh tap and mud. That way you never have to worry about mold if anything happens in these rooms in regards to moisture. everything else use standard drywall. Around fireplaces and stoves i use “type X” drywall as it is fire resistant.

    Just an idea.

    1. That’s interesting Dave – When I talked to the guy who is doing the drywall, he said that they hardly ever installed the greenboard (up here in mi?) and he didn’t recommend it.

      We didn’t have any hugely strong feelings one way or another (it may be too late as I expect they have quite a number of walls up while I’m typing this.

      You believe strongly in using it?

      1. I’m an Architect up here in Canada about 1 hour fron the new your state line….and Professionally yes i do believe strongly in using it for at least the bathroom. Mold and is a serious health issue and the worst part of it is that you don’t know you have a problem till your already getting sick from it and not even know why. Lets put it this way I’d rather be safe then sorry for the extra $2.50 Canadian it costs here a sheet to have piece of mind.

        Personally, and i mean in my own house and through my personal experiences…If my wife can take a hot hot showers long enough and often enough that the constant steam causes growth on the surface of the paint every now and again near the corners closest to the shower ceiling where it meets the wall then I’ve got cause for concern.

        I have ripped out tons of residential and commercial builds for renovations only to find mold growing on the paper back of the gypsum board in typically “wet” areas. As a rule in architectural practice in Canada we always specify a moisture resistant board in wets areas. Since we Canadian architects take the same exams and use the same study material for obtaining our licenses as the American architects I can only assume this is just good practice.

  3. Thanks for a fresh dose of inspiration. I’m gearing up to tackle drywall myself, though it’s for a tiny 4-walled room, and just seeing your accomplishment gives me a little kick in the rear.

    1. I don’t want to mislead you Irina – I have put up my fair share of drywall (by myself even) and you can see all my tips and tricks here – But this bit of awesomeness was accomplished by two professionals in two days… it would have taken me two months to get all that ceiling board up, if not more. 😉

      I totally suggest starting on a tiny four-walled room!

      1. Have you ever heard of a product called Acoustiblok? It is a flexible material that is applied to the walls before installing the drywall. It is really great for solving soundproofing issues.

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